1 TIMOTHY 6

SURVEY OF THE CHAPTER
This chapter consists of the final two charges to the believers in the assembly at Ephesus, and the final two charges to Timothy personally as he serves the Lord amongst them, during the apostle’s absence.  It has to do with the subject of gain of various sorts:

Verses 1,2 Christian slaves, by honouring their masters with honest work for them, share in the benefit that labour brings to the master.
Verses 3-5 Those who teach that gain is godliness, are to be withdrawn from, for their teaching is contrary to the gospel, and the example of Christ.
Verses 6-10 Godliness with contentment is great gain.
Verses 11-16 The seeking first of the kingdom of God and His righteousness will mean that all necessary material things will be provided for, Matthew 6:33.
Verses 17-19 Charge to those who have riches.
Verses 20,21 The doctrines of the faith are precious, and should be kept safe.

STRUCTURE OF THE CHAPTER

(a) Verses 1-10 Sixth charge to the Ephesians.
(b) Verses 11-16 Sixth charge to Timothy.
(c) Verses 17-19 Seventh charge to the Ephesians.
(d) Verses 20,21 Seventh charge to Timothy.

THE WORDS OF THE BIBLE, THE CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES, AS FOUND IN THE FIRST EPISTLE TO TIMOTHY CHAPTER 6, VERSES 1 TO 10:
6:1  Let as many servants as are under the yoke count their own masters worthy of all honour, that the name of God and his doctrine be not blasphemed.

6:2  And they that have believing masters, let them not despise them, because they are brethren; but rather do them service, because they are faithful and beloved, partakers of the benefit. These things teach and exhort.

6:3  If any man teach otherwise, and consent not to wholesome words, even the words of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to the doctrine which is according to godliness;

6:4  He is proud, knowing nothing, but doting about questions and strifes of words, whereof cometh envy, strife, railings, evil surmisings,

6:5  Perverse disputings of men of corrupt minds, and destitute of the truth, supposing that gain is godliness: from such withdraw thyself.

6:6  But godliness with contentment is great gain.

6:7  For we brought nothing into this world, and it is certain we can carry nothing out.

6:8  And having food and raiment let us be therewith content.

6:9  But they that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition.

6:10  For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.

(a)    Verses 1-10        Sixth charge to the Ephesians.

6:1  Let as many servants as are under the yoke count their own masters worthy of all honour, that the name of God and His doctrine be not blasphemed.

Let as many servants as are under the yoke- the reference here is to slaves that had not gained their freedom.  This must not make them bitter.  They might resent the fact that they are yoked to their employer, and might be tempted to not serve him as they should, as believers.  Those in normal employee/employer relationships should observe the principles found here.  The apostle reminded the Colossians believers who were slaves, “ye serve the Lord Christ”, Colossians 3:24.  We must not think that we only serve the Lord when at meetings.  Everyday work is to be done as to Him.  He sanctified honest toil by spending many years in the carpenter’s workshop in Nazareth.  We also note that He chose as His apostles those who were busy at their everyday employment.
Count their own masters– that is, the masters they are duty-bound to recognise as over them.
Worthy of all honour- that is, all the honour that is appropriate.  Needless to say, if their masters are dishonourable in character, then the slaves are not to think of them as honourable regardless of that character.  They are to be honoured as employers, even if they cannot honestly be honoured for their merit.  The Christian slave is not to make the faults of his master an excuse for not giving of his best in his service.
That the name of God and His doctrine be not blasphemed- we represent God to the world, which is very quick to criticise.  Note that the name, or character, of God is linked to His doctrine, for the truths of the faith tell forth the features that mark Him.  Our conduct should harmonise with the doctrine we believe, lest the truth be brought into disrepute.
Note that the apostle does not suggest that these slaves should rebel against their masters, nor that other believers should engage in social reform.

6:2  And they that have believing masters, let them not despise them, because they are brethren; but rather do them service, because they are faithful and beloved, partakers of the benefit.  These things teach and exhort.

And they that have believing masters- this is a situation demanding special care on the part of the believing slave.
Let them not despise them, because they are brethren- a believing slave might feel his master should not own slaves, and despise him because by so doing he seems to be perpetuating the slave-system.
But rather do them service, because they are faithful and beloved- God’s view of the believing master must be shared by the believing slave. The slave should not take advantage of his master’s faith.  The apostle is assuming that Christian slave-owners will indeed be faithful.
Partakers of the benefit- the master has a claim on the benefit of the slave’s labours.  If the master is faithful, he will be concerned about ensuring that his slaves benefit too.
These things teach and exhort- the teachers are to be diligent to set out these practical things, that are often ignored.  Ministry should always be relevant.  Those who minister the Word of God should ensure that their ministry addresses practical issues.  Doctrine is designed to inform our practice.  The principles of the faith should first be taught, and then there can be meaningful exhortation to the practice thereof.

6:3  If any man teach otherwise, and consent not to wholesome words, even the words of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to the doctrine which is according to godliness;

If any man teach otherwise- in 1:3 the apostle warned about doctrine contrary to the truth of the gospel; here it is doctrine contrary to the practice of the gospel.  The gospel is for believers as well as unbelievers, to constantly adjust our thinking.  The teachers were not to incite Christian slaves to rebel, or to be anything less than good workers.
And consent not to wholesome words- that is, health-giving words, conducive to spiritual well-being.  The Greek word gives us the English word “hygienic”.  It is only used by Paul and Luke, who writes of those who were saved, or “made whole” from their illnesses.  The apostle will speak in verse 4 of those who are doting, or sick.
Even the words of our Lord Jesus Christ- we should remember the Lord Jesus speaks through the apostles, for Paul wrote, “the words I speak unto you are the commandments of the Lord”, 1 Corinthians 14:37.
And to the doctrine which is according to godliness- doctrine is vital if we are to live for the pleasure of God.  In context, the doctrine is about the slave/master relationship, but it has general application.  Godliness is the desire to please God.  The Christian slave can please God whilst doing his menial tasks.

6:4  He is proud, knowing nothing, but doting about questions and strifes of words, whereof cometh envy, strife, railings, evil surmisings,

He is proud, knowing nothing- those must be proud who set themselves up against Christ as teacher, which they do if they resist apostolic doctrine.  To do so is to be cut off from the source of truth, hence the ignorance.
But doting about questions and strifes of words- the word doting, as already noticed, means “sick”.  Having rejected health-giving words from the apostles, as they speak for Christ, it is no surprise that they are spiritually sick.  These false teachers hide their ignorance behind argumentative and profitless talk.
Whereof cometh envy- they are jealous of the knowledge believers have through the teachings of the apostles.  By teaching slaves that gain is godliness, verse 5, they cause them to be envious of those who are free men and who prosper.
Strife- they only bring strife because they have not the certainty the truth brings.
Railings- they make up for their lack of insight into the truth by abusing those who hold the truth.
Evil surmisings- their conduct only serves to create wicked suspicion.

6:5  Perverse disputings of men of corrupt minds, and destitute of the truth, supposing that gain is godliness: from such withdraw thyself.

Perverse disputings of men of corrupt minds, and destitute of the truth– they delight to debate and argue, but they achieve no worthwhile result.  This is because their minds are corrupted by error, and they have not allowed Christian truth to govern their thinking.
Supposing that gain is godliness- this is the motivation for the evil things of verse 4.  This may have reference in the first instance to slaves thinking to profit by breaking free.  But it has general application, however.  Under the law of Moses, those who obeyed God’s commandments were promised material prosperity, as a reading of Deuteronomy 28:1-14 will show, so gain was a sign of godliness in Old Testament times, in relation to the nation of Israel in the land of promise.
From such withdraw thyself- this shows that the Old Testament principle is no longer operative.  Godly men would delight to associate with those who had been blessed with material prosperity from God, for it showed that they were obedient to God’s commands.  Things are different in this age of grace, for the Rich One has become poor, 2 Corinthians 8:9, and He is our example.  Self-seeking is anti-Christian.  We are to “look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others”, Philippians 2:4, for this is what Christ did, as described in verses 5-8 of that chapter.

6:6  But godliness with contentment is great gain.

But godliness with contentment is great gain- a godly person is one who seeks to please God in everything.  This is gain, both for God and the believer, both for now on earth, and in eternity in heaven.  But it is great gain if accompanied by contentment.  To be content with spiritual blessings, and to be indifferent to material gain, is a truly godly attitude.  Material gain is no substitute for this.  Only those who are carnal will think so.

6:7  For we brought nothing into this world, and it is certain we can carry nothing out.

For we brought nothing into this world- so everything we have now is either God-given or the result of covetousness.  But God does not satisfy covetous desires, except in discipline, as we see in Numbers 11, where the children of Israel were dissatisfied with God-given manna, and wanted something else.  The psalmists comment on this was “He gave them their request; but sent leanness into their soul”, Psalm 106:15.
And it is certain- contrary to what some seem to think by their attitude to material gain.
We can carry nothing out- “can”, and “nothing” tells us it is impossible. Why try?  The Jewish funeral psalm said, “Be not afraid when one is made rich, when the glory of his house is increased; for when he dieth he shall carry nothing away: his glory shall not descend after him, Psalm 49:16,17.
Whilst it is true that we can carry nothing out when we die, nonetheless it is possible to lay up treasure in heaven while we live, Matthew 6:19-21.

6:8  And having food and raiment let us be therewith content.

And having food and raiment- these are necessary things.  Raiment is literally “coverings”, so may include the idea of a house, a roof over our heads.  As believers we should remember that many of God’s people, through no fault of their own, are without the necessities of life.  Those who have over and above what they need, should be exercised to give to relieve their suffering.
“If a brother or sister be naked, and destitute of daily food, and one of you say unto them, ‘Depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled’;  notwithstanding ye give them not those things which are needful for the body; what doth it profit?  Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone”, James 2:15-17.
“But whoso hath this world’s good, and seeth his brother have need, and shutteth up his bowels of compassion from him, how dwelleth the love of God in him?  My little children, let us not love in word, neither in tongue; but in deed and in truth”, 1 John 3:17-18.
Let us therewith be content- “Let your conversation be without covetousness; and be content with such things as ye have: for He hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee”, Hebrews. 13:5,6.  This is godliness with contentment.

6:9  But they that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition.

But- the apostle now presents the alternative to contentment.
They that will be rich- that is, those who are determined to be rich, to the detriment of their soul’s welfare.
Fall into temptation- the idea is of the whole range of temptation that presents itself when money has been accumulated.  Money gives access to sinful pleasures.  The pleasures of sin and the treasures of Egypt were linked, as far as Moses was concerned, and he refused them, Hebrews 11:25,26.
And a snare- the road to riches is strewn with dangers to spiritual progress.
And into many foolish- because Solomon did not ask for riches, God gave them to him, but only because he asked for wisdom first.  Guided by wisdom from God, he would be enabled to use the riches for God’s glory.
And hurtful lusts- money cannot buy spiritual desires, but it can satisfy lusts that impair our spiritual life.
Which drown men in destruction- the riches of unsaved men sink them into the loss of all they accumulate.  It is as if the rising tide of their riches eventually completely submerges them.
And perdition- they themselves finish in hell.  “For what shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?  Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?  Mark 8:36,37.  We should remember that the words just quoted were spoken to disciples, those who claimed to be learning from Christ.  As far as a true believer is concerned, a life spent accumulating wealth will be a spiritually impoverished life, with the result that the soul is lost in the sense that the life has been mis-spent, and there is nothing spiritual to show for it at the end.  It will be too late then to look back and wonder how to buy back that life’s opportunities.  They will be gone, and gone for ever.

6:10  For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.

For the love of money is the root of all evil- there is the potential in the love of money to be the root of all the evils there are.  By the love of money the apostle means covetousness, which can lead to every sin there is.  Eve did not know what money was, but she coveted the fruit of the tree of knowledge because she had been mislead into thinking it would be to her advantage.
The tenth commandment, “Thou shalt not covet” slew Paul, Romans 7:9.  The reason why this commandment is so potent is because it challenges the innermost feelings we have.  We should remember that covetousness is idolatry, Colossians 3:5.  Anything that diverts our attention away from God and His interests may be classed as idolatry, and covetousness is the desire for those competing things.
Which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith- they have been diverted from the path to spiritual prosperity onto the path to earthly riches.
And pierced themselves through with many sorrows- the Lord Jesus spoke the Parable of the Sower, and the seed sown among thorns is interpreted by Him in this way, “He also that received the seed among the thorns is he that heareth the word; and the care of this world, and the deceitfulness of riches, choke the word, and it becometh unfruitful, Matthew 13:22.  Riches cannot buy spiritual joys, but they can bring multiplied sorrows.  Even the care of this world may lead some to aspire to riches.  So those rich and those poor are alike in danger.

THE WORDS OF THE BIBLE, THE CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES, AS FOUND IN THE FIRST EPISTLE TO TIMOTHY CHAPTER 6, VERSES 11 TO 16:

6:11  But thou, O man of God, flee these things; and follow after righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, meekness.

6:12  Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life, whereunto thou art also called, and hast professed a good profession before many witnesses.

6:13  I give thee charge in the sight of God, who quickeneth all things, and before Christ Jesus, who before Pontius Pilate witnessed a good confession;

6:14  That thou keep this commandment without spot, unrebukable, until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ:

6:15  Which in his times he shall shew, who is the blessed and only Potentate, the King of kings, and Lord of lords;

6:16  Who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach unto; whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and power everlasting. Amen.

(b)    Verses 11-16    Sixth charge to Timothy.

6:11  But thou, O man of God, flee these things; and follow after righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, meekness.

But thou, O man of God- this is an expression used of Moses six times.  There are two ides attached to the title.  Firstly, it has the idea of maturity, one who has grown in spiritual things.  Which is the same as saying one who has grown in Christ-likeness, for He is the true Man of God.  Secondly it has the idea of one who is qualified to be a representative of God to others in some way.  In the case of Moses it was to Israel.  In the case of Timothy, it was to the assembly at Ephesus, on behalf of the apostle.  He would be greatly encouraged in his difficult task by this commendation of him.  Paul had warned Timothy not to let anyone despise his youth, 4:12, so he was a comparatively young man age-wise, but he was mature spiritually.
Flee these things- so even the spiritually mature need to beware.  The believer is to flee the pursuit of material gain, and to follow after the things which will bring spiritual gain.  The apostle is going to list ways in which this may be done.
And follow after righteousness- do not pursue riches, but practical acts of righteousness, which “remaineth for ever”, 2 Corinthians 9:9.  This may well involve the giving away of material things in the interests of Christ.
Godliness- the desire to please God, not self.
Faith- this is the attitude of dependence upon God for daily needs which shows we do not covet after riches.  Even if we lack faith and trust in riches instead of God, we shall find that they are uncertain.
Love- that characteristic which will delight to give to others and which “seeketh not her own”, 1 Corinthians13:5.  Those who truly love will want to give to others in whatever way they are able.  Selfishness is anti-Christian.
Patience- cheerful and hopeful endurance under stress.  The absence of riches does place a strain on us, but the Spirit of God would instil patient endurance into us so that we may be restful in spirit despite outward difficulties caused, perhaps, by poverty.
Meekness- contented acceptance of one’s state.  The Lord Jesus “became poor”, and He could say “I am meek and lowly in heart”, Matthew 11:xxx.  He accepted His position in life as being the will of His Father.  He says to the believer, “learn of Me”, verse xxx.

6:12  Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life, whereunto thou art also called, and hast professed a good profession before many witnesses.

Fight the good fight of faith- Joshua fought to enjoy God’s provision in Canaan, but two and a half  tribes preferred to stay in Gilead for the sake of their cattle.  This was a sign of unbelief, rejecting God’s provision in favour of that territory that He had not promised them. The apostle had already written to the Ephesians to exhort them to take the armour of God, Ephesians 6:11-18, for the Devil would seek to prevent them entering in to the enjoyment of spiritual blessings, and they must resist Him.  Now Timothy is exhorted to do the same, so that in this matter, as in all others, he might be, in the words of 4:12, “an example of the believers”.  The word “good” in this context involves the idea of a good cause to be fighting for, a good result to be achieved, and the use of good technique in the battle.
Lay hold on eternal life- the life given to believers is the life of God, as perfectly expressed in “that Eternal Life, which was with the Father, and was manifested unto us”, 1 John 1:2.  The Lord Jesus gives the perfect example of eternal life in practice.  He Himself contrasted eternal life with the life of men in the flesh when He was praying to His Father; “glorify Thy Son, that Thy Son also may glorify Thee: as Thou hast given Him power over all flesh, that He should give eternal life to as many as Thou hast given Him.  And this is life eternal, that they might know Thee, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom Thou hast sent”, John 17:2,3.  He is clearly distinguishing between men in the flesh, those who have the life of Adam, and those who have eternal life, the life of God.  So the Son glorifies His Father by giving eternal life to those the Father has given to Him.  That eternal life enables the recipient not only to know God and His Son initially, but also to get to know them progressively.  The word for “that” the Lord Jesus used, (“that they might know Thee”), contains those two thoughts.  And the apostle exhorts Timothy to continue in this progressive knowledge of God and His Son, to obtain a good grasp of Divine truth about God and His Son.  As he does this, the true riches will become his, and he will be able to disregard the pursuit of earthly gain that so absorbs men in the flesh.  The apostle wrote to the Colossians about “the riches of the full assurance of the understanding, to the acknowledgement of the mystery of God, and of the Father, and of Christ; in whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge”, Colossians 2:2,3.
Whereunto thou art also called- the call of the gospel brings us into many things, and this is one of them.  As we have just noted, the Son of God glorifies his Father by giving eternal life, so if we lay hold of that life, this results in glory for our God.
And hast professed a good profession before many witnesses- eternal life is not to be hidden away, but manifest.  The Lord Jesus, who is Eternal Life personified, was manifest to the apostles, and they saw and heard Him.  So those who have eternal life should allow it to be seen and heard.  The world looks on, and so do believers, and it is important to give a good impression of Christian things to others, whoever they might be.  To profess is to say the same thing as God.  This is only possible because we have the life which enables us to know Him, who is the only true God.  Truth is centred in Him, and to know Him is to have the truth.  As we witness therefore, we are saying the same things about matters, as God does.  This is a good practice, in the sense that it is beneficial, not just to men who are seeking the truth, but also in the sense that it glorifies God.

6:13  I give thee charge in the sight of God, who quickeneth all things, and before Christ Jesus, who before Pontius Pilate witnessed a good confession;

I give thee charge- to give charge is to convey a command from one (in this case God) to another (in this case Timothy).
In the sight of God- as if God were present in the room when Timothy read the letter.  The apostle is impressing upon him the solemnity of this matter.
Who quickeneth all things- God is not only the active Exposer of false profession, but also the Energiser of good profession, for that profession is the outworking of the eternal life which He, as the Quickener, or Life-giver, has given to Timothy.  Since all things that have life, have it from Him, He must be the source of the energetic confession that Timothy is being exhorted to make.
And before Christ Jesus- He is the prime Example of good profession, for eternal life was found in fullest display in Him.  The apostle now gives us an example of the way in which He confessed before men, so that we may take note, and be encouraged and emboldened to follow His example.
Who before Pontius Pilate- Paul gives him his full name to emphasise that he was the representative of Rome’s power.  Despite this, as we read of the conversations the Lord Jesus had with this man, it becomes evident that the Lord was in control, not Pilate.
Witnessed a good confession- He bore witness unto the truth of His kingdom, and also to the truth that He was only crucified because God allowed it. We see this by noting what John writes in John 18:33-38; 19:8-12.  The truth as to the nature of His kingdom was the subject of the first passage; the truth that it was God, not Pilate, who was in control of events, is the subject of the second passage.  A good confession, then, will assert God’s rights, and assure men that God is in control.  That this is the case will be demonstrated very definitely when Christ comes to reign, displacing earth’s kingdoms and establishing His own.

Some of the features of that coming kingdom may be discovered in John 18:33-38.
John 18:33  Then Pilate entered into the judgement hall again, and called Jesus, and said unto Him, Art thou the King of the Jews?

Then Pilate entered into the judgement hall again- Pilate had entered the judgement hall in verse 28, but then went out to them to ascertain the charge they brought against Christ, and now he is re-entering the judgement hall.
And called Jesus, and said unto Him, Art thou the King of the Jews?  To call Jesus would mean to summon Him for formal examination in a law-situation.  The question of Pilate shows that John has omitted the trial before the Sanhedrin recorded in Matthew 26:57-67.

John 18:34  Jesus answered him, Sayest thou this thing of thyself, or did others tell it thee of Me?

Jesus answered him, Sayest thou this thing of thyself- before answering the question, the Lord establishes the motive behind it.  Pilate is finding that he is the one being questioned now. In His responses, the Lord reveals the characteristics of His kingdom.  Christ’s kingdom is a righteous kingdom, and justice prevails there.
If Pilate was saying this of himself, it meant that he had not investigated the matter himself before accepting that it was a valid charge for anyone to make.
Or did others tell it thee of Me? This question is designed to point out that the Jews switched charges, and hence are acting illegally.  He, the Just One, is establishing this was done unjustly.  This is not an evasion on the part of the Lord.  He will state directly in verse 37 that He is a king, but He is making sure that all concerned know the facts of the case, and do not make decisions based on rumour and innuendo.  The question also aims to establish what Pilate means by “King of the Jews”.  Is he using it as a Roman would, or as a Jew would?

John 18:35  Pilate answered, Am I a Jew? Thine own nation and the chief priests have delivered Thee unto me: what hast Thou done?

Pilate answered, Am I a Jew? This is the first of three questions, and is a semi-sarcastic jibe at the oddities, (in his Roman view of things), of the Jewish culture.  It tells us he is not looking at things dispassionately, but in a prejudiced way. Christ’s kingdom will not be limited to Israel, so whether Pilate, a Roman, could understand was irrelevant.
Thine own nation and the chief priests have delivered Thee unto me- this was only half-true, as the nation had welcomed Him as He rode into Jerusalem as King, John 12:12-15.  It was the chief priests who had delivered Him for envy. His kingdom will be welcomed- “Blessed is He that cometh in the name of the Lord”, Psalm 118:26.
What hast Thou done?  This suggests that Pilate thought He may have been the ring-leader in some trouble-making.  That this is not the case is seen in the Lord’s reference to what had happened in the Garden of Gethsemane the night before.

John 18:36  Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world: if My kingdom were of this world, then would My servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is My kingdom not from hence.

Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world- these words must have been strange and troubling to Pilate.  The Lord readily admits that he is a king, but not of the sort Pilate was used to.  He was soon to be made friends with Herod, and he was the sort of king Pilate knew.  Pilate was not familiar with the idea of a kingdom originating from any other place than earth.  Pilate is being assured that His kingdom is not to be set up in rivalry to Caesar, although one day this kingdom will displace all Gentile kingdoms, Daniel 2.
If My kingdom were of this world, then would My servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews- earthly kingdoms are established and increased by means of the armies they deploy.  The fact that Christ’s kingdom is not of this sort is seen in that the servants of this king are not organised into an army.  The sense of the verb “fight” is “keep on fighting”, a reference no doubt to the fact that Peter had put up some sort of resistance in Gethsemane when the arrest party came.  But Pilate must have known that Christ rebuked Peter for this, and even went to far as to ask permission to heal Malchus, (“Suffer ye thus far”, Luke 22:51).  What king rebukes His subjects for fighting, and then heals the wounds of a soldier of the opposing army?  This king, and His kingdom, must be of a different sort.
But now is My kingdom not from hence- these words might be misunderstood to mean that this king had suddenly changed tactic under pressure from Pilate, and was now resolved to employ different methods to gain His objective.  But nothing could be further from the truth.
The “but now” must be linked with the “if” near the beginning of verse 36.  There is a conditional statement beginning with “if”, which sets out a possible situation, namely, that His kingdom was of this world.  But this is immediately rejected with the words “but now”.  In other words, His kingdom is of another sort all along, and the possible scenario beginning with “if” must be rejected.

John 18:37  Pilate therefore said unto him, Art Thou a king then? Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a king. To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the truth heareth My voice.

Pilate therefore said unto him, Art Thou a king then? Pilate’s response was to ask again and pointedly whether He was a king. The Lord is now prepared to answer the question directly, because He has established that: (a) He is not a troublemaker; (b) that His is not a rival kingdom to Caesar’s; (c) that the charges Pilate is bringing have not been properly investigated by Pilate.
Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a king- this is not an evasive reply.  Nor does it indicate that Christ is a king only in the minds of those who believe it, with His kingship not relevant to the rest of men.  Rather, this is the formal way a polite Jew will answer a direct question.  It is the same as saying “Yes”, but the Lord is using the Rabbinical formula for answers to direct questions.  Courtesy forbids a direct yes or no, but it is a direct answer.
We see this same response when Judas asked, “Master, is it I”, and the reply came, “Thou hast said”, Matthew 26:25.  So also in Luke 22:70,71, where the question of the high priest as to whether Christ is the Son of God is answered by the words “”Ye say that I am”.  If this was prevarication, the question would have been asked again.  As it is, the response of the chief priest was to declare that no more witnesses were needed, “for we ourselves have heard of His own mouth”.  He knew full well what the answer had meant.  Mark, with characteristic brevity, gives the Lord’s answer as simply “I am”, the last words of the reply in Luke.  It is still the case, however, that the courteous formula is used, and not a direct “Yes”.
To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth- the Lord connects His birth and His entrance onto the public stage, as not to establish His kingdom in manifestation, but to bear witness of the truth so that men may believe and be born again and thus enter the kingdom of God in its present form.
Every one that is of the truth heareth My voice- this is a direct appeal to Pilate, encouraging him to believe, and thus avoid the shame of condemning Him falsely, contrary to the truth.  His kingdom is based on truth, not deceit and lies like the kingdoms of men, and His kingdom consists of loyal subjects, who love the truth.
No wonder Pilate is baffled, for the word of a Galilean carpenter seems to be more believable that the word of the Jewish authorities.
The character of the subjects of Christ’s kingdom is seen in the phrase “hear My voice”, for that is what His sheep do, 10:27, words spoken in Solomon’s Porch, the place where the king sat to judge.
God’s ideal king is a shepherd-king.

John 18:38  Pilate saith unto him, What is truth? And when he had said this, he went out again unto the Jews, and saith unto them, I find in Him no fault at all.

Pilate saith unto him, What is truth? How could he decide these opposing assertions?  The fact is, that the answer to his problem had just been given to him.  “He that is of the truth heareth My voice”.  The genuine seeker after the truth will come to the genuine imparter of truth.  So it is that in His conversation with Pilate, the wearer of the Imperial Purple on behalf of Rome, Christ displays the superior purple of the eternal and heavenly kingdom, which He will one day set up on earth, but which His born-again people have already entered, John 3:3,5; Colossians 1:13.  These features of His kingdom tell us of the character of His kingship.  There is no response to this question, for the answer has already been given to him.
And when he had said this, he went out again unto the Jews, and saith unto them, I find in Him no fault at all- when he went out before, it was to ask what the accusation was, “What accusation?”, verse 29, but now he has concluded that the prisoner is not guilty.  “I find in Him no fault all” is a legal pronouncement, indicating that he considers, as the representative of Caesar, that there is no legal ground for punishing Him.  Thus it stands recorded that Christ was crucified illegally, and this is the ultimate condemnation of human rule.

The second conversation Christ had with Pilate is in John 19.  Remember that the Lord Jesus has been crowned with thorns, and there is nothing in the record that suggests the crown was not still on His head as He spoke to Pilate.

John 19:9  And went again into the judgement hall, and saith unto Jesus, Whence art Thou? But Jesus gave him no answer.

And went again into the judgement hall, and saith unto Jesus, Whence art Thou?  He is not asking where He was born, or who His parents are.  Pilate is fearful that the gods have sent one of the ‘sons of the gods’ to judge him.  The Lord has already distinguished between being born, and coming into the world, 18:37, but this is lost on Pilate.
But Jesus gave him no answer- it is important to notice that sometimes Christ answered, and sometimes He did not, when asked questions during His trials.  The prophet had said that He would be dumb before His shearers, so He only answered when He was not being shorn of His own glory.  When it was a question of the honour of His Father, or the defence of His disciples, or to rebuke the injustice of His accusers, He spoke.

John 19:10  Then saith Pilate unto Him, Speakest thou not unto me? knowest Thou not that I have power to crucify Thee, and have power to release Thee?

Then saith Pilate unto Him, Speakest thou not unto me?  He is amazed that this Galilean peasant should dare to remain silent when questioned by the representative of Rome.  But He does not speak because Pilate has already condemned and scourged Him, contrary to justice, (for he pronounced Him innocent and then condemned Him to death), and to co-operate in that would be untrue to Himself as the Just One.
Knowest Thou not that I have power to crucify Thee, and have power to release Thee?  God has put a sword in the hand of the rulers he ordains to be in government.  That sword is for the punishment of evildoers, and those who resist that power.  We read of this in Romans 13:1-7.  So Pilate was right to a certain extent, for he represented a God-ordained ruler, namely Caesar.

John 19:11  Jesus answered, Thou couldest have no power at all against Me, except it were given thee from above: therefore he that delivered Me unto thee hath the greater sin.

Jesus answered, Thou couldest have no power at all against Me, except it were given thee from above- Pilate was clearly ignorant of the true source of his power.  He thought it came from Rome, but he learns now that it comes from heaven.  However, Pilate’s power only extended to the punishment of evildoers, and Christ was not one of these.  So the only way Pilate can have real power against Christ is by special licence from God, in order that His purpose might be worked out in the death of His Son.
Therefore he that delivered Me unto thee hath the greater sin- Pilate’s sin was great, in that he had condemned a man he himself declared to be innocent.  But Caiaphas’ sin was greater, since he should have had an enhanced sense of justice, as instructed by the law of God.

We may conclude from the example of the Lord Jesus in the passages we have looked at that we are called to witness to righteousness, Divine authority, spiritual principles, and the truth.
We now return to the words of 1 Timothy chapter 6, and Paul’s charge to Timothy to maintain a good confession in the face of the opposition of men.

1 Timothy 6:14  That thou keep this commandment without spot, unrebukable, until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ:

6:14  That thou keep this commandment without spot- Timothy is not to spoil his profession by being stained by the world and its attitudes, as demonstrated by Pilate.  We cannot imagine Timothy allowing the scroll that the apostle had sent to him to be stained and spoiled.  So he is not to allow the world to stain the truth the scroll contains.
Unrebukeable- we should remember the judgement seat of Christ comes before we appear with Him in glory.  Paul was concerned “that ye may be blameless in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ”, 1 Corinthians 1:8.  The word “blameless” means “not condemned when called to account”.  At the judgement seat of Christ believers will be called to account for their actions.  How much better to be unrebukeable now, will nothing needing to be adjusted, that to have it adjusted in that day.  So ‘without spot’ refers to our care of the commandment; ‘unrebukeable’ refers to our care about ourselves.
Until the appearing of our Lord Jesus Christ- we are to make Him apparent by our confession, until He manifests Himself in accordance with His confession before Pilate.

6:15  Which in His times He shall shew, who is the blessed and only Potentate, the King of kings, and Lord of lords;

Which in His times He shall shew- now is the time of testimony in the gospel of God’s grace, 2:6.  When Christ comes in glory it will be times of wrath, judgement, and rule.  Notice that the times are His times, for He will bring man’s day to an end, and begin the Day of the Lord, when His will and judgement will be dominant.
Who is the Blessed- the psalm that is quoted in Hebrews 1:8 about Christ on His millenial throne says, “God hath blessed Thee for ever”, Psalm 45:2.  He received cursing from men when they rejected His claims, but God has compensated Him abundantly, already, and will do so again.
And only Potentate- all the kings of the earth must give way to Him.  The image representing human rule that Nebuchadnezzar saw in his dream, is destroyed totally by a stone that descends from heaven, Daniel 2.  The Lord Jesus claimed to be that stone when He said, “What is this then that is written, ‘The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner?’  Whomsoever shall fall upon that stone shall be broken; but on whomsoever it shall fall, it will grind him to powder”, Luke 20:17,18.  Isaiah declared when speaking of the Day of the Lord, that “the Lord alone shall be exalted in that day”, Isaiah 2:17.
The King of kings, and Lord of lords- that is, He shall excel in reigning and shall excel in ruling.  Reigning as King supposes opposition, ruling as Lord supposes subjection.  Timothy may have confidence as he confesses such a one, that his stand will be vindicated one day, for Christ’s reign is certain.

6:16  Who only hath immortality, dwelling in the light which no man can approach unto; whom no man hath seen, nor can see: to whom be honour and power everlasting. Amen.

Who only hath immortality- this is the state of being untouchable by death in a resurrection body. At present Christ is the only one who has an immortal body.  At the resurrection the mortal bodies of believers shall “put on immortality”, never to be touched by death again, for “mortality shall be swallowed up of life”, 1 Corinthians15:53; 2 Corinthians 5:4.
Dwelling in the light that no man can approach unto- He came to bring the light of the glory of God into the world of men, but they rejected it.  He said, “As long as I am in the world I am the light of the world”, John 9:5.  He has now withdrawn from men, and is in the presence of His Father.  So our confession of Him is vital if men are to get to know Him, for we form the bridge between Christ and men by our testimony.  The light has “shined in our hearts to give the light of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ”, 2 Corinthians 4:6.  God produced light at the beginning where all was darkness, so now, He has shined in our dark hearts to give the light to us, but also so that it may shine out to others.  But it is not we that shine, for our testimony is to the person of Christ; the glory is in His face, not ours.
Whom no man hath seen nor can see- as the disciples watched the Lord Jesus ascend into the heaven, Luke tells us that “a cloud received Him out of their sight”, Acts 1:9.  Men in general have not seen Him since he was taken down from the cross.  Nor can they see Him with the natural eye for He has gone to heaven.  So if men are to respond to the testimony we give them, they must come to Christ in faith.
To whom be honour and power everlasting- this is Paul’s desire and should be ours also.  Men despised and dishonoured Him, and do so still, but God has honoured Him, and so should believers by their confession of Him.  He was “crucified through weakness, yet He liveth by the power of God”, 2 Corinthians 13:4, for He has been raised from the dead and elevated to glory by God’s mighty power, Ephesians 1:19,20.

THE WORDS OF THE BIBLE, THE CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES, AS FOUND IN THE FIRST EPISTLE TO TIMOTHY CHAPTER 6, VERSES 17 TO 19:
6:17  Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy;

6:18  That they do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to distribute, willing to communicate;

6:19  Laying up in store for themselves a good foundation against the time to come, that they may lay hold on eternal life.

(c)    Verses 17-19    Seventh charge to the Ephesians.

6:17  Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy;

Charge them that are rich in this world– Paul uses the word for world here which emphasises the idea of an age the world passes through.  He is referring to this current period of time, opposed to the coming age when Christ shall reign, verse 15.  We are to live now in accordance with kingdom-principles of righteousness and godliness.  Believers are of the day of His kingdom, not the night of this world’s rebellion against Divine rule, 1 Thessalonians 5:5.
Riches bring temptation to live carnally.  We see this with the Corinthians, whom Paul said “reigned as kings”, for they were living as if the kingdom had come.  The apostles distanced themselves from such an attitude, 1 Corinthians 4:8.
That they be not highminded- as if riches bestow a high spiritual status.  Those who are entrusted with riches by God should not think themselves to be superior to others.  Rather they should consider how they might serve others with their wealth.  Joseph of Arimathea humbled himself to associate with the crucified Christ, and gave, as a rich man, his own tomb, Matthew 27:57-60.
Nor trust in uncertain riches- the one thing certain about riches is that they are uncertain.  “For riches certainly make themselves wings,” Proverbs 23:4,5.  It is not only the cares of this world, (brought on oftentimes by poverty), that “choke the word”, Matthew 13:xxx, crowding out spiritual exercises and activity, but also “the deceitfulness of riches”.
But in the living God- He is active in the support of His people. We may safely trust Him.  To trust riches is unsafe.
Who giveth us richly all things to enjoy- as a faithful Creator He provides all necessary things.  He is not against innocent pleasure.  “No good thing will the Lord withhold from them that walk uprightly,” Psalm 84:11.  The upright can be trusted to not mis-use good things.

6:18  That they do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to distribute, willing to communicate;

That they do good- this is what those who are entrusted with riches from God are to use those riches for.  All believers should be marked by good works, but those who have resources from God have a special responsibility to be exercised about this matter, for he has entrusted them with the means to do much good to others.
That they be rich in good works- note the play on the words “riches” and “rich.”  Their good works should be as abundant as their riches.  The rich fool thought only of himself, Luke 12:13-21.  Seeking “treasure for himself”, he lost it all.  Those who are “rich toward God” retain it all.
Ready to distribute- “There is that scattereth, and yet increaseth: And there is that withholdeth more than is meet, but it tendeth to poverty”, Proverbs 11:24.  The farmer scatters his seed, and then reaps a greater amount.  The word “ready” is the old word for liberal.  The apostle declared, “He that soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly”, 2 Corinthians 9:6.  And the wise man of the Old Testament wrote, “the liberal soul shall be made fat”, Proverbs 11:25.
Willing to communicate- our giving to others should not be reluctant, but motivated by God’s great act of giving towards us.  God loveth a cheerful giver”, 2 Corinthians 9:7, one who is full of joy as he gives.

6:19  Laying up in store for themselves a good foundation against the time to come, that they may lay hold on eternal life.

Laying up in store for themselves- but in a different sense to the rich farmer laying up treasure for himself.  “He that hath pity upon the poor lendeth unto the Lord; and that which he hath given will He pay him again”, Proverbs 19:17.  The Lord Jesus exhorted us to “Lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven”, Matthew 6:20.
A good foundation against the time to come- does this mean that if we lay the foundation of our “heavenly storehouse”, the Lord will build the rest of it for us?
That they may lay hold on eternal life- all believers have eternal life through faith, but we need to take hold of the principles involved, and act upon them.

The Lord Jesus had things to say about the matter of riches, and the use to which it is put, in Luke 12:13-21.  He had been asked to judge between a man and his brother over an inheritance.  He refused to do this, but used the opportunity to give teaching about the mis-use of riches.  He spoke a parable that has become known as “The parable of the Rich Fool”.  This parable is often used, and rightly so, to warn the unsaved of the brevity of life and the certainty of death, and other things besides.  We should note, however, that the application of this parable is addressed to disciples, verse 22.

THE WORDS OF THE BIBLE, THE CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES, AS FOUND IN THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO LUKE CHAPTER 12, VERSES 13 TO 34:

12:13 And one of the company said unto Him, Master, speak to my brother, that he divide the inheritance with me.

12:14 And He said unto him, Man, who made Me a judge or a divider over you?

12:15 And He said unto them, Take heed, and beware of covetousness: for a man’s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth.

12:16 And He spake a parable unto them, saying, The ground of a certain rich man brought forth plentifully:

12:17 And he thought within himself, saying, What shall I do, because I have no room where to bestow my fruits?

12:18 And he said, This will I do: I will pull down my barns, and build greater; and there will I bestow all my fruits and my goods.

12:19 And I will say to my soul, Soul, thou hast much goods laid up for many years; take thine ease, eat, drink, and be merry.

12:20 But God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided?

12:21 So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.

12:22 And He said unto his disciples, Therefore I say unto you, Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat; neither for the body, what ye shall put on.

12:23 The life is more than meat, and the body is more than raiment.

12:24 Consider the ravens: for they neither sow nor reap; which neither have storehouse nor barn; and God feedeth them: how much more are ye better than the fowls?

12:25 And which of you with taking thought can add to his stature one cubit?

12:26 If ye then be not able to do that thing which is least, why take ye thought for the rest?

12:27 Consider the lilies how they grow: they toil not, they spin not; and yet I say unto you, that Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.

12:28 If then God so clothe the grass, which is to day in the field, and to morrow is cast into the oven; how much more will he clothe you, O ye of little faith?

12:29 And seek not ye what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink, neither be ye of doubtful mind.

12:30 For all these things do the nations of the world seek after: and your Father knoweth that ye have need of these things.

12:31 But rather seek ye the kingdom of God; and all these things shall be added unto you.

12:32 Fear not, little flock; for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom.

12:33 Sell that ye have, and give alms; provide yourselves bags which wax not old, a treasure in the heavens that faileth not, where no thief approacheth, neither moth corrupteth.

12:34 For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.

Blessedness?
The ground of a certain rich man brought forth plentifully, Luke 12:16.  If he was a Jew, the man would no doubt have prided himself on his blessedness.  Were not his riches a sign of Divine favour?  After all, God’s promise to those who obeyed His law was plentiful harvests, Deuteronomy 28:1-14.  Only those who disobeyed would know famine.  But the response of the man to his plentiful harvests is a certain indicator of the state of his heart.  He sees in his plenty an opportunity for ease and enjoyment, all the while ignoring the needs of others.
With the coming of Christ a great change came in regard to riches.  He came in grace, a higher principle than law.  Since He has come, those who say “Gain is godliness”, must be withdrawn from, 1 Timothy 6:5, so contrary is that idea to the spirit of Christianity.  Whereas in Old Testament times the spiritual person should have been pleased to associate with one who was blessed materially, for God was with him, now it is different.  Too often, it seems as if the Lord’s people are still in Old Testament times in this regard.  Those who only have enough, and have none to spare, are sometimes thought of as being inferior- perhaps even work-shy and incompetent.  But would we dare to display this attitude to Christ?  That most  spiritual Man, who magnified the law and made it honourable, (and who therefore merited riches as a mark of Divine favour), became poor for our sakes.  Behold His poverty at Calvary!

Foolishness
Having seen the rich man’s sham blessedness, we now are told of his real foolishness.  It is no surprise to learn that he is a fool, for he thinks “within himself” :17.  He is not prepared to allow the authority of the Word of God a place in his thinking.  It is only as we allow the mind of Christ to govern our reasonings that we shall respond in a spiritual way to the temptations that riches represent.  It is instructive to notice that when offered choices, Solomon refused riches and chose wisdom.  But then because he had chosen wisdom, he was entrusted with riches as well, 1 Kings 3:5-13.

Lavishness
We next learn of the man’s lavishness.  Unconcerned by the need all around him, (“For the poor ye have always with you”,) he embarks upon an extravagant building programme.  Did he really need to pull down his barns?  Could he not have erected an extension to the existing ones, and donated the money saved to a good cause?  It was Ambrose who said, “The bosoms of the poor, the houses of widows, the mouths of children, are the barns which last for ever”.  Goods bestowed in those barns will reap an eternal reward.

Callousness
But there is worse yet, for he is determined to eat, drink, and be merry, refusing to consider the plight of others.  The words of the apostles are relevant here, “If a brother or sister be naked, and destitute of daily food, and one of you say unto them, Depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled; notwithstanding ye give them not those things which are needful to the body; what doth it profit?  Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone”, James 2:15-17.  “But whoso hath this world’s good, and seeth his brother have need, and shutteth up his bowels of compassion from him, how dwelleth the love of God in him?  My little children, let us not love in word, neither in tongue; but in deed and in truth”, 1 John 3:17,18.  These are searching questions posed by the apostles – what doth it profit?…how dwelleth the love of God in him?  Can those who profess to have been so remarkably and eternally benefitted by God is His love, shut their eyes to the needs of those around them, whilst all the time indulging their appetites?

Short-sightedness
Contrary to what he thought, this foolish man did not have “many years”.  He was guilty of short-sightedness, as we all can be.  It was that night that his soul was required of him, and he was called into eternity, and what he had done and been on earth was assessed.  Solemn thought!  The deeds believers have done in the body shall yet come under review, whether good or evil, and we shall receive for what we have done, 2 Corinthians 5:10.  The good will be rewarded, the evil will be rebuked.
Now there comes the question, “Whose shall those things be which thou hast provided?”  This is a question we could all profitably ask ourselves.  The words of Job are plain- “Naked came I out of the womb, and naked shall I return thither”, Job 1:21.  Job realised that he would not carry his vast possessions with him into eternity.  And the apostle Paul no doubt had this in mind when he wrote, “We brought nothing into this world, and it is certain we shall carry nothing out”, 1 Timothy 6:7.  We ought to give serious attention to this matter of what will happen to what we possess, (be it much or little), when we leave this scene.  Is it not the case that too often there are surpluses which could be invested in the work of God now, rather than waiting for Inheritance Tax to take its sizeable share?

Rich toward God
The summary the Lord gives of the situation is brief.  “So is he that layeth up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God”.  These are the alternatives, self or God.  It should not be difficult for a believer to choose between the two.  As the word is in another place, “Ye cannot serve (as a slave) God and mammon, (riches), Matthew 6:24.  It is possible to have two employers at the same time, but it is not possible to be a slave to two masters at once, for slavery involves the total surrender of the will to another.  We should ask ourselves the question therefore whether we are slaves to money or to God – there is no middle ground.

Necessities
Having corrected a wrong attitude to luxury, the Lord now turns specifically to His disciples to ensure that they have a right attitude to necessities.  Of course it is scriptural for believers to provide for necessities.  To not do so is to be “worse than an infidel”, 1 Timothy 5:18.  Here, however, the warning is against obsessive, anxious care.  Having food and clothing we should therewith be content.  Food sustains our life, but what we do with our life is vastly more important than the food which sustains it, for “the life is more than meat”, Luke 12:23.  So with the body.  How we serve the Lord with our body is much more important than the clothes we put on it.  It is sad indeed if believers are more concerned about food and clothing than the work of God.

THE WORDS OF THE BIBLE, THE CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES, AS FOUND IN THE FIRST EPISTLE TO TIMOTHY CHAPTER 6, VERSES 20 AND 21:

6:20  O Timothy, keep that which is committed to thy trust, avoiding profane and vain babblings, and oppositions of science falsely so called:

6:21  Which some professing have erred concerning the faith. Grace be with thee. Amen.

(d)    Verses 20,21    Seventh charge to Timothy.

6:20  O Timothy, keep that which is committed to thy trust, avoiding profane and vain babblings, and oppositions of science falsely so called:

O Timothy- this expression tells us that the apostle is going to make an earnest appeal to Timothy.
Keep that which is committed to thy trust- he had been entrusted with the task of acting for the apostle at Ephesus, and he should be faithful to his stewardship, for “it is required in stewards, that they be found faithful”, 1 Corinthians 4:2.  We all have been given some task to do for the Lord; let us also be faithful.
Avoiding profane and vain babblings- Paul had warned of those who teach error, in 1:6,7.  He must guard against the God-dishonouring and valueless talk of men who teach error.  They had turned aside from the truth, so Timothy must turn from them.
And oppositions of science falsely so called- the gnostics, those who claimed to be the “knowing ones”, would vigorously oppose apostolic doctrine.  They claimed superior knowledge, but it was false knowledge.

6:21  Which some professing have erred concerning the faith.  Grace be with thee.  Amen.

Which some professing have erred from the faith- the body of apostolic doctrine that has been committed to the saints is the standard by which all teaching is to be judged.  To depart from that is to err, or to miss the mark.
Grace be with thee – Timothy will need an ongoing supply of grace from God to enable him to serve the Lord acceptably.  This is true of us all.  Grace in this context means free-favour from God in the form of spiritual help to enable work to be done for Him.  The apostles needed this form of grace, and so do we, Ephesians 3:2,7,8.
Amen- the word comes to us from the Old Testament, where it has the idea of that which is settled and established.  It is used to refer to the faithfulness of God, for instance in Deuteronomy 7:9, and Isaiah 65:16.  The apostle’s earnest desire was that the teaching he had given in this epistle, both to Timothy personally and also to the Ephesian believers through him, should be carried out faithfully, and become an established part of their behaviour, to God’s glory.

 

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