Category Archives: MATTHEW 2

The account of the visit of the wise men to the infant Christ, and the flight into Egypt

MATTHEW 2

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MATTHEW 2

THE WORDS OF THE BIBLE, THE CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES, AS FOUND IN THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW CHAPTER 2, VERSES 1 TO 12:

2:1 Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem,

2:2 Saying, Where is He that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen His star in the east, and are come to worship Him.

2:3 When Herod the king had heard these things, he was troubled, and all Jerusalem with him.

2:4 And when he had gathered all the chief priests and scribes of the people together, he demanded of them where Christ should be born.

2:5 And they said unto him, In Bethlehem of Judaea: for thus it is written by the prophet,

2:6 And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Juda, art not the least among the princes of Juda: for out of thee shall come a Governor, that shall rule My people Israel.

2:7 Then Herod, when he had privily called the wise men, enquired of them diligently what time the star appeared.

2:8 And he sent them to Bethlehem, and said, Go and search diligently for the young child; and when ye have found Him, bring me word again, that I may come and worship Him also.

2:9 When they had heard the king, they departed; and, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was.

2:10 When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.

2:11 And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary His mother, and fell down, and worshipped Him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto Him gifts; gold, and frankincense and myrrh.

2:12 And being warned of God in a dream that they should not return to Herod, they departed into their own country another way.

2:1 Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem,

Now when Jesus was born- Matthew does not give us an account of the actual birth of Christ, but tells us that Joseph was to name the child after He had been born, and now he tells us what happened after that. He does not tell us how long after the birth the events he narrates took place, but we may deduce it to a degree. Whereas Dr. Luke tells us the circumstances of the birth, Matthew acts as a registrar, recording the birth officially, as befits the report of the birth of the King.
The expression “when Jesus was born” does not mean that the wise men came the moment He was born. The sense is “Now, Jesus having been born”, without specifying how much time had elapsed. Matthew’s main object is to tell us the birth was during the reign of Herod. He shows how Israel’s king became an enemy of Christ, whereas Luke shows how that the Gentile Caesar, by his issuing a decree as to where the citizens should be enrolled, unwittingly ensured the fulfilment of prophecy.
In Bethlehem of Judea- this is where the prophet Micah said He would be born, and the scribes understood it that way. Bethlehem was David’s home town, and it was appropriate that his most illustrious son should be born there. This confused the Jews later on, for some said, “Shall Christ come out of Galilee? Hath not the scripture said that Christ cometh of the seed of David, and out of the town of Bethlehem, where David was?” John 7:41,42. So they knew Jesus as being of Nazareth, yet the scripture said Messiah would come out of, (“apo”), Bethlehem. Some decide, therefore, that Jesus cannot be the Messiah. This was because they did not note the difference between being “apo” a town, and being “ek” a town. “Apo” a town means you are living there at the time spoken of; “ek” a town means that was where you were born. For instance, Philip was of (apo) Bethsaida, but he was (ek) the city of Andrew and Peter, which was Capernaum. (The word “ek” is in the Textus Receptus, but has been left untranslated in the Authorised Version). So the fact is that Philip was currently living in Bethsaida, but he originated from the same city as Andrew and Peter, namely Capernaum.
So they said that Jesus was from (apo) the town of Bethlehem, meaning that was where He lived. In this, of course, they were wrong. If they had said He was from (ek) the town of Bethlehem, they would have been right, for that was His birthplace. Of all the occasions that the Lord Jesus is designated as being of Nazareth, (including when He described Himself as such in Acts 22:8), only two have a preposition in the phrase. Those two references are Matthew 21:11, when He rode into Jerusalem, and the multitudes, many of whom would have come from distant countries for the feast, asked who He was, and Acts 10:38, where Peter is preaching to the Gentile Cornelius. So those not familiar with the Jewish scene were told He came from Nazareth as His hometown. He is never said to be Jesus “ek” Nazareth, as if that was His birthplace. We shall see in verse 6 that He was “ek” Bethlehem.
In the days of Herod the king- Matthew has an interest in the throne of Israel, so relates his narrative of the birth of the True King in connection with Herod, who was on the throne of Israel at the time. Luke, however, relates his history to Caesar, for Christ is Son of man, destined to govern the whole world, and do it in a far more extensive way than even Caesar did or could.
Behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem- we are not told that these men are kings, nor are we told there were three of them. We should beware of jumping to conclusions in spiritual matters, and always have Scriptural support for what we believe and teach. “What saith the scripture” was the watchword of the apostles.
The word Matthew uses for these men is “magi”, but we should not assume they were magicians. Herodotus uses the term for a tribe of Medes who had a priestly role in the Persian empire. Daniel uses the word of wise men who attended on the King, and claimed to have the ability to interpret dreams, Daniel 1:20; 2:27; 5:15. They were simply learned men, and probably had a deep interest in astronomy. They came from the east, just as Balaam had done many centuries before, Deuteronomy 23:4. Naturally, because they had realised that a king had been born, they made their way to the palace.

2:2 Saying, Where is He that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen His star in the east, and are come to worship Him.

Saying, Where is He that is born King of the Jews?- they use the expression King of the Jews, whereas Nathaniel called the Lord Jesus the King of Israel, John 1:49. There are two terms by which the descendants of Jacob were known. They were Israelites, based on Jacob’s other name Israel. This is their name of destiny, for God’s promise is to bless them as Israel. After the nation had been taken into captivity, however, they began to be called Jews, for this is their name of disgrace. The word is based on the name Judah, the tribe that the kings came from. Something of the low state of the nation is indicated, therefore, by this use of the term King of the Jews. The Lord Jesus had made Himself of no reputation, and it is even seen in this title that men gave to Him.
For we have seen his star in the east- the star must have been a supernatural sign given to them, judging by the way it moved, as verse 9 describes, and as this verse implies. They had observed the sudden appearance of this star, for the words are literally “we have seen His star in its rising”. No conjunction of planets could have directed them in such an accurate way, even to the extent of standing over the specific house where Christ was.
It is said that the ancients allocated portions of the night sky to individual nations. Balaam referred to this when he said, “There shall come a star out of Jacob, and a sceptre shall rise out of Israel, and shall smite the corners of Moab, and destroy all the children of Sheth. And Edom shall be a possession, Seir also shall be a possession for His enemies; and Israel shall do valiantly”, Numbers 24:17,18. So when the magi see a star appear in the section of the sky allotted to the nation of Israel, they correctly deduce that Balaam’s prophecy is beginning to be fulfilled. By star is meant a prominent person, and by sceptre is meant someone to rule. We are reminded of Jacob’s words to Judah, “The sceptre shall not depart from Judah…until Shiloh come, and unto Him shall the gathering of the people be”, Genesis 49:10.
Being learned men, the magi would no doubt have a copy of the Old Testament, and would know both Jacob’s words, and also the prophecy of Balaam. They put the two together, and resolved to be amongst those who “gathered” to the new-born King. Perhaps they were surprised on arrival in Jerusalem, the capital city, that there was not a great stir at the news of the birth of a king. Is this why they asked where He was, as if they thought they had come to the wrong place? The star does not seem to have led them all the way from the east. They saw it in it’s significant place in the sky, drew their own conclusions, and headed for Jerusalem. It is only after they have not found the King there that the star reappears for them, verse 9.
Notice the unusual idea they have, for no-one is born king normally. The order is usually the birth of a prince who succeeds to the throne on the death of his father the king. This child is different, and even the expression used shows it. He does not succeed to David’s throne only because He is descended from David, for we have already seen in chapter 1 that He is not the son of Joseph, whose right to the throne was cancelled by him being descended from Jeconiah. He cannot be King by that route, even though He is descended from David. His kingship is vested in His Deity, for God is King of Israel, Isaiah 44:6, and He is God, and the Lord God will give to Him the throne of His Father David, so it will be His by higher prerogative than even Solomon. When he sits on the throne of Israel God the Father will say to Him, “Thy throne, O God, is for ever and ever”, Hebrews 1:8.
And are come to worship Him- they may not have fully known the identity of this child. It was fitting that they should worship Him, for He is God manifest in flesh, but they do not necessarily realise this, They think Him simply worthy of great respect, since a sign of His birth has been placed in the heavens. But He has made Himself of no reputation.

2:3 When Herod the king had heard these things, he was troubled, and all Jerusalem with him.

When Herod the king had heard these things, he was troubled- well might he be, for he had spent the forty years of his reign in warding off rivals, murdering them if necessary. The reference to a star would not be lost on him, and the ominous words of Balaam would terrify him, for Balaam had spoken of Edom being a possession, and Herod was partly Edomite. Was this a prophecy of his downfall at the hands of the new king?
And all Jerusalem with him- Balaam had said, “Out of Jacob shall come He that shall have dominion, and shall destroy him that remaineth of the city”, Numbers 24:19. Did the inhabitants of Jerusalem wonder if this meant them? They did not realise that, far from bringing trouble on the nation, Christ came as the Prince of peace. But that peace would be founded on righteousness, and this was why the men of Jerusalem were troubled, for they had guilty consciences. Before he foretells the coming of John the Baptist, Isaiah records God’s words to Jerusalem, “Comfort ye, comfort ye, My people, saith your God. Speak ye comfortably to Jerusalem, and cry unto her, that her warfare is accomplished, that her iniquity is pardoned: for she hath received of the Lord’s hand double for all her sins”, Isaiah 1:1,2. God anticipates the result of the coming of Christ, and the atonement He would make for her sins. Only because of this can Jerusalem know comfort. When the wise men came, however, it was a guilty city, in that it went along with Herod and his wickedness. It would later on multiply its guilt by casting out her rightful King and crucifying Him. There can be no comfort for such a people. When He comes again, however, there will be “a fountain opened to the house of David and to the inhabitants of Jerusalem for sin and uncleanness”, Zechariah 13:1. They will come into the good of His atoning sacrifice at Calvary.

2:4 And when he had gathered all the chief priests and scribes of the people together, he demanded of them where Christ should be born.

And when he had gathered all the chief priests and scribes of the people together- this is an indication of the low state of the nation. Herod the king has no real claim to the throne, the scribes are a poor replacement for the prophets, and the chief priests are riddled with corruption. They, all of them, demonstrate the great need in the nation. Isaiah said Messiah would be a root out of dry ground, and here is an illustration of the dryness of that ground.
He demanded of them where Christ should be born- it is interesting that Matthew interprets the request of Herod as an enquiry about the Messiah. He is in no doubt that the Messiah and the King of the Jews is one and the same person. The tense of the verb “demanded” is the imperfect, meaning “he kept on demanding or pestering”. Herod is desperate to know the birthplace of this rival king. This is the sure indication of a man with an evil conscience, who knows his claim to the throne is shaky.

2:5 And they said unto him, In Bethlehem of Judaea: for thus it is written by the prophet,

And they said unto him- they do not seem to have to think about the matter; for them it is common knowledge. For Herod it was new information, such was his disinterest in the Scriptures.
In Bethlehem of Judaea: for thus it is written by the prophet- there was another Bethlehem in the territory of Zebulun in Galilee, Joshua 19:15 so the correct town is given here.

2:6 And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Juda, art not the least among the princes of Juda: for out of thee shall come a Governor, that shall rule my people Israel.

This is a quotation from Micah 5:2. The words as found in Micah and Matthew are as follows:

MICAH 5:2 MATTHEW 2:6
1. But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, 1. And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Juda,
2. though thou be little 2. art not the least
3. among the thousands of Judah, 3. among the princes of Juda:
4. yet out of thee shall He come forth unto Me 4. for out of thee shall come
5. that is to be ruler in Israel; 5. a Governor, that shall rule my people Israel.
6. whose goings forth have been from of old,
7. from everlasting.

And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Juda- The word “Ephratah” identifies the town in Old Testament times, as “in the land of Juda” does in New Testament times.
Art not the least- Micah emphasises the littleness of the town in his day. How appropriate that it should be the birthplace of Him who had made Himself of no reputation. He comes not to a famous capital city, but a small place. However, through His birth there the town has received a stature beyond its size, for it is now not the least. Like its honourable visitant, it has gone from littleness to greatness.
Among the princes of Juda- the word for prince has the thought of chief person or place. The scribes have been asked where the king of the Jews is to be born. The one who is to be born is in no way inferior to the rest of the princes of Judah, so the place is no longer inferior either, despite being the least among the cities thousands of Judah in old time.
In Line 4 Micah emphasises that this Personage comes forth to God. The scribes simply say “come forth”, thus lessening the impact of the words of the prophet. Perhaps they can see that Herod is not pleased with the facts that are being presented to him. Matthew infallibly records the fallible translation of the scribes.
For out of thee shall come- the word ruler in Micah’s prophecy is an allusion to the promise God gave to David, that “There shall not fail thee a man to be ruler in Israel”, 2 Chronicles 7:18. The scribes are strictly correct in their translation, but they are careful to not give the impression that this governor is actually destined for the throne. The scribes speak of “My people Israel”, which perhaps explains why they did not say “unto Me” in line 4, for the thought is contained in the expression “My people”. If He rules God’s people, then He comes forth to God in that way. He will present Himself as the rightful heir to the throne. He would also offer Himself without spot to God, Hebrews 9:14, presenting Himself for sacrifice, for He is son of Abraham as well as son of David.
A Governor, that shall rule My people Israel- the idea in the word govern is that of ruling as a shepherd rules his flock, for their benefit and protection. A direct contrast to the rule of Herod, who being part-Edomite, was like Esau the father of the Edomites, who was a cunning hunter, Genesis 25:27.
Lines 6 and 7. The scribes stop at this point, perhaps afraid to speak of the other-worldly nature of this ruler who is to be born. They appreciate that Herod will be even more agitated than he already is by such a thought. It is a sad fact that this is indicative of the attitude of the religious leaders of Israel during Christ’s public ministry. They refused the fact that He had been in the purpose of God from all eternity, waiting for that moment when He would step into time to fulfil His Father’s will. Here was a testimony to the eternal being of the Messiah, yet when He came they refused that claim.

2:7 Then Herod, when he had privily called the wise men, enquired of them diligently what time the star appeared.

Then Herod, when he had privily called the wise men- he makes no comment about the word from the scribes, but immediately begins to devise ways of ridding himself of this rival. But he does not want the scribes to know of this yet, for their consciences are no doubt less hardened than his, and they may protest, and delay his plans. They might also alert the wise men to the cruelty of Herod.
Enquired of them diligently what time the star appeared- he wishes to calculate the age of the child, so that he knows who to slaughter. It took Ezra four months to travel from Babylon to Jerusalem, Ezra 7:9.

2:8 And he sent them to Bethlehem, and said, Go and search diligently for the young child; and when ye have found Him, bring me word again, that I may come and worship Him also.

And he sent them to Bethlehem, and said, Go and search diligently for the young child- craftily he uses the wise men to be his spies, so that suspicion against him is not roused. He forgets that “the eyes of the Lord are in every place, beholding the evil and the good”, Proverbs 15:3. He now knows that the one born is a young child, not a new-born baby.
Notice that neither Herod nor the scribes “spiritualise” the prophet’s words, as if to say the child would be born in the “House of Bread”, the meaning of the name Bethlehem. They saw Bethlehem as a physical location, and not a metaphor for a prosperous place. The prophetic writings have no settled meaning if they at the mercy of the imagination of the expositor.
And when ye have found Him, bring me word again, that I may come and worship Him also- if the wise men had not been warned of God, they would have done this. They clearly do not know the character of the man they are dealing with. They might have thought it strange that Herod did not accompany them, but it was not advisable to question a king in those days.

2:9 When they had heard the king, they departed; and, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was.

When they had heard the king, they departed- perhaps they were not allowed to be present when the scribes told Herod the location of the child’s birth, so they have to rely on Herod relaying them the information. They hear this, and also his desire to worship the child at a later date.
And, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them- Matthew indicates that the star, having appeared to them in a significant place in the sky when they were in the east, in their home country, now appears again, but this time moving, so that they are able to follow where it leads. This could not be said of any planet. These are learned men; they are not going to imagine a stationary star is moving. They do not have to ask how to get to Bethlehem, for the star guides them. As they travelled, they might have wondered why the king was not born in the palace in the capital city. But this is no ordinary king. They must have even more surprised if they were to see the child in Nazareth, which was an obscure place.
If it is the case that Joseph and Mary have returned home to Nazareth with the child, and have then gone up to Jerusalem to present Him to the Lord at the age of forty days, and returned to Nazareth again, they have done their duty according to the law before Herod is aware of the birth of the child.
Till it came and stood over where the young child was- it is important to notice that Matthew does not say the star led them to Bethlehem. No doubt they were expecting to be led there, according to the word of the scribes, but the “lo” indicates something of their surprise when the star did not take the Bethlehem road. It is important that Herod should think they are going to Bethlehem, in order that Joseph and Mary may have time to make their escape. So the star, having appeared in the sky when they were in the east, and having reappeared to move them on from Jerusalem, now stands still over the house where the child is, thus pinpointing accurately the spot. Matthew does not say the star was over the house where the family were, but where the young child was, for He is the object of their search. They are left in no doubt as to who they should worship, and to whom they should give their gifts. Those who wish to give Christ His due must do so guided by light from heaven.

2:10 When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.

When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy- either this is prior to the star moving them on to where the child was, indicating they were genuinely delighted that they are being led to the one they seek, or, that they rejoiced when they saw that the star had stood still over the house.

2:11 And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary His mother, and fell down, and worshipped Him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto Him gifts; gold, and frankincense and myrrh.

And when they were come into the house- so Matthew does not mention a stable, nor does he call the Lord Jesus a babe, as Luke does in his account of the birth. The sequence of events is given to us by Luke, for he tells us that the child is presented to the Lord at the age of forty days, and then Joseph and Mary return to Nazareth, Luke 2:22,39. Mary has offered the gift the poor were allowed to bring, so she could not yet have the gold and other valuable gifts the wise men brought. The shepherds are not said to have offered gifts. The place where they came is deliberately left vague, lest superstition should be encouraged.
They saw the young child with Mary his mother- their object of attention, and worship, is the Lord Jesus alone. No mention is made of Joseph, and Mary is called His mother, not Mary, so there is no prominence given to her at all, she is just the mother of the most important person in the house. Nor is the expression “mother and child” used, for the same reason. Such an expression has pagan undertones, stemming as it does from the idolatrous system initiated by Semiramis, the wife of Nimrod.
And fell down, and worshipped Him- they worship Him with no ulterior motive, for the child is not yet on the throne; they are not trying to gain favour from an influential monarch. We need not think of this worship being given because they thought Him to be God manifest in the flesh, unless they were informed in some way that this was the case. The worship here is that attitude of respect and deference that is due to an important person; so important that a sign appeared in the heavens at His birth.
And when they had opened their treasures- they no doubt needed resources for the journey, yet are prepared to put their needs to one side, as they recognise His greatness. They had clearly made preparation for their visit to this king, and they do not hesitate to give Him their gifts even though He is not in a palace, for the star has guided them. They did not make the surroundings an excuse to keep their treasures to themselves. The word “treasure” has the idea of a casket in which valuables are placed for safe keeping”. But like Mary of Bethany, who “kept” her alabaster box, but then broke it, John 12:7, so these open their treasures, and dispense them to Him who is most worthy of them.
They presented unto Him gifts; gold, and frankincense and myrrh- each one of these items was extremely valuable. In fact, frankincense is said to be worth its weight in gold, and all three gifts would be valued highly by kings. We can be sure that heaven valued their gifts highly too, for they represented the estimate these wise men had of His worth. We do not know if the wise men saw the significance of their gifts, but how appropriate they were, and also the order in which they were given.
They first of all give gold, that which in the Scriptures is the symbol of Deity. How fitting that this should be given to Him, (not to Mary or Joseph), for He is God manifest in flesh, 1 Timothy 3:16. Then there was frankincense. We note the following things in connection with this.  It was a gum which came from the leaves of a tree, especially when it was bruised in some way. it was white, the colour of righteousness. Whilst it was bitter to taste, nonetheless it was very fragrant when heat was applied to it.
A picture is built up in our minds by these facts. That which manifests itself from within, and this more abundantly under suffering; which by its very name is white, speaking of righteousness and purity; which is at one and the same time bitter and sweet; which is in great demand, and therefore is costly, being said to be worth more than its weight in gold, with kings and emperors competing to secure the best samples.
There is presented to us in these things the very features which marked Christ as a man. For thirty largely-silent years He yielded to God that which gave Him the utmost pleasure, for He grew up before Him as a tender plant, Isaiah 53:2. Yet when the trials and buffetings of His ministry amongst men began, they only served to diffuse the blessedness of His person. He was characterised by righteousness and purity. So much so that He can be positively identified simply by the terms “Holy One”, Psalm 16:10, and “The Holy One and the Just”, Acts 3:14. He is Jesus Christ the righteous, 1 John 2:1.
His life was a perfect blend of sorrow because of the condition of things all around Him, and deep, personal joy in God. He was Man of Sorrows, Isaiah 53:3, yet spoke of His own special joy, John 15:11.
He is expressly described by God as precious, Isaiah 28:16, 1 Peter 2:4,6, and this is echoed by His people, for “unto you therefore which believe He is precious”, 1 Peter 2:7. Like the frankincense, Christ came from other climes, being “from above”, John 8:23, for He came down from heaven.
And such was the preciousness of the personality and character of Christ to His Father, that, like the sweet incense of old, He has been given a place before the very throne of God in the sanctuary, Exodus 30:36, Hebrews 9:24. Perhaps the apostle John had this in mind when, having spoken of the one who is the propitiation for our sins, he goes on to comfort the children of God that their sins have been forgiven for His name’s sake, 1 John 2:12. Their forgiveness is firmly established on the ground of the shed blood of Christ, and on the merits of His person as the Father appreciates them.
The fact that the frankincense was an ingredient of the holy incense, as well as of the meal-offering, reminds us that there has been a man down here who was utterly dependant on His God, for the incense is especially connected with prayer. See Psalm 141:2: Luke 1:10 and Revelation 8:3,4. Unlike Adam, who rebelled against God despite the abundant evidence of His goodness and provision, Christ maintained unswerving loyalty even when in the desert and hungry. He would only act in unison with His Father, refusing all the enticements of the Devil. He was cast upon God from the womb, even when it seemed He was most dependant upon Mary. This dependence was evidenced by His energetic prayer life.
Then there was myrrh, another fragrant and bitter substance. The myrrh tree yields its gum naturally under the hot desert sun, but its flow is increased when its bark is cut or bruised. So Christ, the “tree planted by the rivers of waters”, Psalm 1:3, yielded a sweet fragrance to God as a result of the trials and temptations He experienced during His life. But this was greatly increased when He was on Calvary’s tree. Instead of reacting like the dying thieves, with cursing and railing, there were only spiritual responses from His heart. So it is that His Person, His Life, and His death are all prefigured by the three sorts of gifts the wise men gave. They may have been called wise by men because of their earthly knowledge, but they display the wisdom that comes from above in their choice of gifts. How tragic that during His ministry He was despised, and not esteemed by His own people, Isaiah 53:3, and at the end of His life He should be betrayed for just thirty pieces of silver, the price of a wounded slave.
The items the wise men gave were valued in Egypt, and could all be easily converted to the currency of Egypt. Joseph and Mary now have the necessary resources for the flight into Egypt, and their stay there, but the gifts were presented to Christ Himself. As His guardians, they administer them for Him wisely. Joseph no doubt could ply his trade as a carpenter in Egypt, but there was certainly disruption to his normal work in Nazareth, where his customers were. God recompenses him in return for caring for His Son.

2:12 And being warned of God in a dream that they should not return to Herod, they departed into their own country another way.

And being warned of God in a dream that they should not return to Herod- they are not now directed by the star, but by a dream. The star disappears, its purpose served, and there is now no indication to Herod where the child is. Even if he was crafty enough to have sent spies to follow the wise men, they slip away, and the star disappears, even though, presumably, their dream was at night. They still have light in the darkness, for God has spoken to them. They are not told why they should not return to Herod, so they show unquestioning obedience to God as He makes known His will in a dream. It is normal now for God to direct the path of His people by the word of God, their infallible guide.
They departed into their own country another way- as has often been noticed, when we have come into personal contact with Christ in some way, either at conversion, or when we come together to remember Him, we can never go out as we come in. His presence always makes a difference. The road through Nazareth joins with the road to Damascus, leading to Babylon, so they do not have to return via Jerusalem to get to their homeland.

THE WORDS OF THE BIBLE, THE CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES, AS FOUND IN THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO MATTHEW CHAPTER 2, VERSES 13 TO 23:

2:13 And when they were departed, behold, the angel of the Lord appeareth to Joseph in a dream, saying, Arise, and take the young child and His mother, and flee into Egypt, and be thou there until I bring thee word: for Herod will seek the young child to destroy him.

2:14 When he arose, he took the young child and His mother by night, and departed into Egypt:

2:15 And was there until the death of Herod: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Out of Egypt have I called My son.

2:16 Then Herod, when he saw that he was mocked of the wise men, was exceeding wroth, and sent forth, and slew all the children that were in Bethlehem, and in all the coasts thereof, from two years old and under, according to the time which he had diligently enquired of the wise men.

2:17 Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremy the prophet, saying,

2:18 In Rama was there a voice heard, lamentation, and weeping, and great mourning, Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted, because they are not.

2:19 But when Herod was dead, behold, an angel of the Lord appeareth in a dream to Joseph in Egypt,

2:20 Saying, Arise, and take the young child and His mother, and go into the land of Israel: for they are dead which sought the young child’s life.

2:21 And he arose, and took the young child and His mother, and came into the land of Israel.

2:22 But when he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea in the room of his father Herod, he was afraid to go thither: notwithstanding, being warned of God in a dream, he turned aside into the parts of Galilee:

2:23 And he came and dwelt in a city called Nazareth: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene.

2:13 And when they were departed, behold, the angel of the Lord appeareth to Joseph in a dream, saying, Arise, and take the young child and His mother, and flee into Egypt, and be thou there until I bring thee word: for Herod will seek the young child to destroy Him.

And when they were departed- the Lord waits until the wise men are gone before telling Joseph to flee. In this way the wise men, if accosted by Herod’s spies after Joseph and Mary have fled, can honestly say they do not know where they have gone.
Behold, the angel of the Lord appeareth to Joseph in a dream, saying- this was more than likely the same night the wise men had their dream, (given the urgency of the matter), but after they had left. The angel of the Lord, had assured Joseph that it was right for him to marry Mary, 1:20, and now he is giving Joseph direction again. Heaven gives him guidance as to who to marry, and where to live. And that guidance is still available to believers today, for they are of great importance.
Arise, and take the young child and His mother- the angel refers to Mary as “His mother”, and not “thy wife”. The focus is very firmly fixed on Christ, not the mother, important though she is. It is the safety of the child that is paramount. The word used for “take”, both here and in verse 20, means “to associate with oneself in any familiar act or relation”. It is used in 1:20 when the angel said to Joseph, “fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife”. The idea is that Joseph is to take personal and direct responsibility for both the young child and His mother, just as he had taken personal responsibility for Mary by marrying her.
And flee into Egypt- many centuries before, another Joseph had gone into Egypt, and had been used of God to preserve His people Israel from a world-wide famine. Joseph’s words to his brothers, (who had sold him into Egypt as a slave), were, “But as for you, ye thought evil against me; but God meant it unto good, to bring to pass as it is this day, to save much people alive. Now therefore fear not: I will nourish you, and your little ones”, Genesis 50:2021. Notice the reference to little ones, for it is the preservation of the nation that is in view. Now another little one is going to be preserved, and He will have a spiritual seed, and will save His people from their sins.
And be thou there until I bring thee word- Joseph is not given specific details as to where he should live in Egypt. There were many Jews in the country, amongst whom he might make his temporary home. He is assured as he goes, however, that his return is certain, and the timing of it is in the Lord’s hands. He will have a specific word from God Himself when the time is right to return to Israel. He is being led on one step at a time.
For Herod will seek the young child to destroy Him- Herod pretended to be interested enough in the child to come and worship Him, but this was a lie. If it had been true, why did Herod not accompany the wise men? He planned to wait until they had told him where the child was, and had gone on their way home, and then destroy Him. The expression “Herod will seek” is not simply a prediction, but signifies that he is about to, suggesting his determination.
For long centuries Satan had been attempting to prevent the birth of the seed of the woman, knowing that He would bruise his head, Genesis 3:15. He did this by trying to obliterate the line of the Messiah. He failed, however, so he then sought to destroy Him after He was born. He failed in this, too, for the plan of Herod was thwarted, and Joseph and Mary, being warned of God, took the child Jesus into Egypt, out of harm’s way. In the days of Athaliah there were many sons who could succeed to the throne, but here there is but one.
We read in the Book of Revelation of a sign that John saw in heaven. A woman, representing the nation of Israel, was ready to give birth to a man-child. But John also saw a great red dragon, representing Satan, and John says “the dragon stood before the woman which was ready to be delivered, for to devour her child as soon as it was born”, Revelation 12:3,4. He failed, however, so he then sought to destroy Him after He was born, and used murderous Herod in the attempt. It was foreordained that Christ should die by crucifixion, Psalm 22:16. He must not die by the men of Nazareth stoning His mother because she was with child without being married, (which is one reason why she went to stay with Elizabeth), or by Herod’s sword; or by being flung over a cliff at Nazareth, Luke 4:29; or by being stoned in the temple, John 8:59, 10:31, but by the Gentile mode of crucifixion.

2:14 When he arose, he took the young child and His mother by night, and departed into Egypt.

When he arose, he took the young child and His mother by night, and departed into Egypt- the angel of the Lord had said to him “Arise”, and now he immediately obeys, for Matthew says, not “And he arose”, but “When he arose”, as if he did not have to contemplate whether to obey or not. He arose from his sleep, and did not wait to arise in the morning, for the matter was urgent. With speed they gather a few things together, no doubt, and immediately, in the night, go on the way to Egypt.

2:15 And was there until the death of Herod: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Out of Egypt have I called My son.

And was there until the death of Herod- it is usually said that Herod died in March or April, 4 BC, meaning that Christ was born some years before the year that begins Anno Domini.
That it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet- we have noted in connection with the quotation found in 1:23. Both there, and here, in 2:15, the Greek word “ina” is used, which means it is “in order that it might be fulfilled”, and the event in question completely fulfils the prophecy. So the prophecy about the virgin’s Son has been completely fulfilled, and so has Hosea’s reference to God calling His Son out of Egypt. It had a partial fulfilment when the nation was brought out at the Exodus, and now it will have its final fulfilment.
Saying, Out of Egypt have I called My son- here Matthew uses a statement made by Hosea about Israel being brought out of the affliction of Egypt, “When Israel was a child I loved him, and called My son out of Egypt”, Hosea 11:1. Notice that Matthew is referring to the coming out of Egypt in the context of their stay there. It is not until verse 19 that we get the account of the return from Egypt. In this way, by the use of a literary device, he is associating the Lord Jesus even more closely with the affliction in Egypt. Israel was God’s national firstborn son, Exodus 4:22; Christ is God’s eternal Firstborn Son, Colossians 1:15,18. He will feel for their national bondage in a day to come, and their bitter sorrow, (for they shall be “led away captive into all nations”, Luke 21:20-24), and will be the means of their deliverance. Just as the lamb was the means of deliverance at the Exodus, so the Lamb of God will be the means in the future. Their joy will be expressed by the four and twenty elders in heaven when they fall down before the Lamb, and sing a new song, saying, “Thou art worthy…for Thou wast slain, and has redeemed us to God by Thy blood out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation”, Revelation 5:8,9.

2:16 Then Herod, when he saw that he was mocked of the wise men, was exceeding wroth, and sent forth, and slew all the children that were in Bethlehem, and in all the coasts thereof, from two years old and under, according to the time which he had diligently enquired of the wise men.

Then Herod, when he saw that he was mocked of the wise men, was exceeding wroth- Herod took the departure of the wise men without informing him of the whereabouts of the child as a personal affront. He clearly had an inflated sense of his own importance, as well as a violent temper.
And sent forth, and slew all the children that were in Bethlehem, and in all the coasts thereof- Herod is not only furious, but fearful. He is not wholly a Jew, but is part Edomite, (and Esau, the father of the Edomites, was “a cunning hunter”, Genesis 25:27), and relies on the support of the priestly class for his hold on the throne. The news that a king had been born in the appointed place, and had been signalled in the heavens, was deeply worrying to him. He responds in the only way he knows, by violence.
Because the wise men did not come back to him, he still thinks the child is in Bethlehem, (rather than, as we have suggested, Nazareth), and so concentrates his murderous intent on that place. Not content with just the city, he takes in the surrounding area. And not content with tiny babies, extends his edict up to children of two years old. Of course this means that children that are almost three years old are included in the massacre. Such is the wicked wrath of the king.
According to the time which he had diligently enquired of the wise men- this strongly suggests that, even allowing for the fury of the king ordering more babies that necessary to be slaughtered, the child Jesus is more than just a new-born baby. Perhaps Herod is suspicious of the wise men now they have out-witted him, and imagines they did not give him the correct time of the star’s appearing. Just to be sure the rival to his throne is removed, he orders the death of children as well as babies. Diligently means accurately, so he is not making a guess.

2:17 Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremy the prophet, saying,

Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremy the prophet, saying- here, in contrast to verse 15, the word “tole” is found, and indicates that the event was merely a case in point, and is only a partial fulfilment, for there will be tribulation for all Israel in a day to come, so the complete fulfilment awaits a future day.

2:18 In Rama was there a voice heard, lamentation, and weeping, and great mourning, Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted, because they are not.

In Rama was there a voice heard, lamentation, and weeping, and great mourning- to understand why Matthew quotes this passage from Jeremiah 31:15 we need to look at the setting. Jeremiah chapters 30-33 form a definite section in his prophecy, and are concerned with the future restoration of the nation of Israel. In fact, if we read the following two verses to the one Matthew quotes, the Lord says “Thus saith the Lord, Refrain thy voice from weeping, and thine eyes from tears: For thy work shall be rewarded, saith the Lord; and they shall come again from the land of the enemy. And there is hope in thine end, saith the Lord, that thy children shall come again to their own border”. Now the event which caused “Rachel” to weep, was the carrying away of Judah and Benjamin into captivity by Nebuchadnezzar. Jeremiah was personally involved in that, for he was in Jerusalem in prison for his faithful ministry when the invaders came, and was taken with the captives on the way to Babylon, Jeremiah 39:9,10. But Nebuchadnezzar gave instruction to the captain of the guard to ensure his safety, and he escorted him home, verses 11-14. Now the Babylonians and the captives had gone as far as Ramah when Jeremiah was set free, see 40:1, so he had personal knowledge of what the captives felt like as they left Ramah for Babylon. He expresses those feelings in the words Matthew quotes.
Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted, because they are not- Ramah was a strong-hold in the territory of Benjamin, on the road that goes north to Damascus and Babylon. The name “Rachel” is used here as she was the mother of Benjamin, Jacob’s youngest son, and therefore “mother” of the tribe. She represents the feelings of the tribe as they are carried away from their homeland; she is the “voice” of the nation. “They are not” means they are not any longer in the land, but as we have seen, they are to return, for the Lord said, “thy children shall come again to their own border”.
How does this relate to Herod’s cruelty to the children of Bethlehem? We have already noticed that Matthew quotes from Hosea 11:1 about Israel being brought out of Egypt, verse 14, but he does it in connection with the Lord being taken into Egypt, as if to say that His being brought out again is a foregone conclusion. This shows the Lord’s solidarity with the nation, as its King. And Matthew’s quote from Jeremiah is another instance of that, for the sorrow of the mothers in Bethlehem is a foretaste of the sorrow of the nation of Israel during the great tribulation.
To understand why that is we need to remember what other thing happened near Bethlehem. Jacob was making his way back to the land of Canaan from Padan-Aram with his wives and children, and we read “And they journeyed from Bethel; and there was but a little way to come to Ephrath: and Rachel travailed, and she had hard labour. And it came to pass, when she was in hard labour, that the midwife said unto her, Fear not; thou shalt have this son also. And it came to pass, as her soul was in departing, (for she died) that she called his name Benoni: but his father called him Benjamin. And Rachel died, and was buried in the way to Ephrath, which is Bethlehem. And Jacob set a pillar upon her grave: that is the pillar of Rachel’s grave unto this day. And Israel journeyed, and spread his tent beyond the tower of Edar”, Genesis 35:16-21.
So just outside of Bethlehem Ephratah, near to the tower of Edar, (which means “flock”, suggesting a tower used by shepherds as they kept watch over their flocks by night on the hillside outside of Bethlehem, see Luke 2:8), Rachel dies in giving birth to a son. She names him Benoni, which means “son of my sorrow”, but afterwards his father called him Benjamin, which means “son of my right hand”.
Now in his statement in Jeremiah 31 that Matthew quotes here, the prophet sees in the sorrow of Rachel outside of Bethlehem a metaphor for the trials and afflictions the nation of Israel will go through in the Tribulation Period, just before they are re-instated in the land of Israel under the Messiah. And those sufferings were described by the Lord Jesus as sorrows, the word referring to birth-pangs, Matthew 24:8. This is why Jeremiah uses the name Rachel in his day, even though she lived many centuries before, for the mothers in Ramah are sharing her experience.
So by quoting Jeremiah’s word about the sorrow of Rachel, Matthew indicates that he sees in this incident an example of the solidarity of Christ with the nation. He is associated with them in their suffering, and He is also associated with them, (by being brought out of Egypt as the nation of Israel was), with their joy and deliverance. We can see now why Matthew connects the sorrow of the mothers in Bethlehem with Ramah in the territory of Benjamin.
It is interesting to notice that Micah, having uttered the prophecy about the birth of Christ that the scribes quoted in verse 6 of this chapter, immediately says, “Therefore will He give them up, until the time when she which travaileth hath brought forth”, Micah 5:3. So again there is a link between the birth of Christ and the nation bringing Him forth through suffering in a day to come.
No doubt His mother told Him of these things as He grew up, (for she kept all these sayings in her heart, Luke 2:51), and in that way it could be said of Him, as was said of God when His people were oppressed in Egypt, “in all their affliction He was afflicted”, Isaiah 63:9. He is now the Son of His Father’s right hand, having been caught up to the throne of God, and has taken those feelings for His oppressed earthly people to heaven with Him.

2:19 But when Herod was dead, behold, an angel of the Lord appeareth in a dream to Joseph in Egypt,

But when Herod was dead- because we do not know exactly how old the Lord Jesus was when the wise men came, we do not know how long He was with Joseph and Mary in Egypt. He cannot have been very old because Isaiah’s prophecy implied that he would be living in the land of Israel before He reached the age of discretion, Isaiah 7:16.
Behold, an angel of the Lord appeareth in a dream to Joseph in Egypt- in Luke the communications to Mary are by an angel directly, whereas in Matthew they are to Joseph by an angel in a dream. God had said, “And be thou there until I bring thee word”, verse 13,and he had been obedient to that command. We can easily see why Joseph was God’s choice to be the legal guardian of His Son, for he could be trusted to comply with God’s will.

2:20 Saying, Arise, and take the young child and His mother, and go into the land of Israel: for they are dead which sought the young child’s life.

Saying, Arise, and take the young child and His mother, and go into the land of Israel- this is the fourth instance in the chapter where the emphasis has been on the young child, and Mary is called His mother. The Spirit of God is guiding Matthew to repeat this, so that it is firmly established that this is the order. The Spirit knew that the Mary-cult would raise its ugly head in later years, with its connections with the Mother and the Child of pagan mystery religions, emanating from Babylon.
Note that the land is called the Land of Israel, for it was promised to Jacob, (whose name was changed to Israel), as well as to Abraham, and is the land where the Messiah shall rule. Israel means “governed by God”, yet at the time it was governed by Rome. Only when the Messiah has returned to the land a second time shall it live up to its name. It will then be Immanuel’s land, Isaiah 8:8, and Jesus is Emmanuel, Matthew 1:22.
For they are dead which sought the young child’s life- Matthew uses the plural here, meaning more than Herod. Herod’s eldest son Antipater expected to succeed his father. However, he had two step-brothers, so he influenced his father to have them executed. However, Herod had him executed also just five days before he died. We may well think that if Antipater was jealous of his own step-brothers, and their claim to the throne, he would also be jealous of someone who was reputed to have been born king in Bethlehem. He would seek His life, too, but he and his father were removed by God. In this way it can be said, “they are dead”. How ironic that Herod succeeded in slaying his own son, but failed to slay God’s Son.

2:21 And he arose, and took the young child and His mother, and came into the land of Israel.

And he arose, and took the young child and His mother- this is the eighth time in the chapter that Christ has been described as a young child.
And came into the land of Israel- Joseph is coming from one country, Egypt, to another country, Israel, which was divided into three main parts, Judea, Samaria and Galilee. This is the land that was promised to Abraham, but it was also promised to Jacob just after his name had been changed to Israel, meaning “prince with God” or “governed by God”, Genesis 35:10-13. It is only those who accept the government of God that can be described as princes with God. It was immediately after this, as Jacob journeyed, Rachel died near to Bethlehem as she gave birth to Benjamin, verses 16-20.

2:22 But when he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea in the room of his father Herod, he was afraid to go thither: notwithstanding, being warned of God in a dream, he turned aside into the parts of Galilee:

But when he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea in the room of his father Herod- with Herod and his son Antipater both dead within a few days of each other, Archelaus succeeds Herod his father, but is not given the title king, but ethnarch. It is as if the presence of the Rightful King in the Land of Israel, His rightful kingdom, means other kings must give way.
He was afraid to go thither- Joseph does not seem to have heard of this new development before he arrived in the land. God allows him to make the discovery himself, for he is being weaned away from relying on dreams, although he is given one more when there is no other way. Archelaus was said to be more cruel than his father Herod.
On his way back to Israel from Egypt, Joseph, (if he took the main route, which he probably would for safety reasons), would come to Gaza just after he had crossed into the land of Israel. We may surmise that he stopped the night in some inn, and there learned the situation with regard to Archelaus and his cruelty.
Notwithstanding, being warned of God in a dream- did he contemplate going to some other country? He had been instructed to go to Israel though. The only way to decide what to do is to ask Divine guidance, and this he receives. Did he retire to bed in a state of trouble of mind, just as he had done when he learned that Mary was with child? And that night the angel warned him from God about Archelaus.
He turned aside into the parts of Galilee- this is the same verb that Matthew uses to describe Joseph’s departure to Egypt, and also that of the wise men back to their homeland. It means to withdraw, to put a distance between oneself and something. The wise men withdrew from Herod after they had been warned to go home another way, (a different word to the one used in verse 9 when they departed from Herod to find the child. That word simply means they went on their way). Joseph withdrew from the land of Israel when warned of Herod’s evil intent, and now he withdraws again, this time from the danger posed by Archelaus. The “parts of Galilee” means those regions that made up the province of Galilee, divided as it was between the northern tribes of Israel.
But why did he go into Judea in the first place? He must have been heading that way, because once he learned about Archelaus he was afraid to go there. We know that Mary was of Nazareth, and Luke 2:4 inclines us to believe that Joseph was from that place too. The words are, “And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth into Judea”. It is not conclusive from these words that he lived there, but it is very probable. These things being so, why did Joseph not go straight to Nazareth? Did he feel that he should live in Bethlehem, since it was from here that the Messiah should emerge? Or was it to preserve Mary from the scandal that conceiving a child before wedlock carried with it? It may not have been very long since they left Nazareth, and folk would remember the circumstances, and not understand.
Just after the city of Gaza the road from Egypt divides. The right hand fork goes to Jerusalem and Judea, the left hand fork goes to Galilee through Nazareth. So it was that Joseph withdrew from going to Judea and took the road to Galilee instead.

2:23 And he came and dwelt in a city called Nazareth: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene.

And he came and dwelt in a city called Nazareth- it seems a little strange that Matthew should write here as if Joseph and Mary had not lived there before. We might have expected, “And he came and dwelt again in Nazareth”, but this is not what Matthew wrote by the Spirit. Note it is Joseph who does this. Of course “the young child and Mary His mother” are with him, but the idea is that he, as the head of the house, now decides to settle down in Nazareth.
That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets- we now learn why Joseph must settle in Nazareth; it is so that the testimony of the prophets might be fulfilled. The formula “that it might be fulfilled” uses the word “opus”, which means that the fulfilment is not complete, but an event which was within the scope and intention of the prophecy. So the dwelling in Nazareth was but part of the fulfilment of the words of the prophets, but did not exhaust the meaning. There were other ways in which their words would be fulfilled.
He shall be called a Nazarene- there is no statement in the Old Testament that corresponds to these words. But then, Matthew does not say there is, for he says, “spoken”, not “written”, and “by the prophets” in the plural. It is the consensus of the testimony of the prophets which is in view here, not a particular statement they wrote down. Of course it is not Joseph that is referred to as a Nazarene, even though he was going to live there.
We know from Revelation 19:10 that “the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy”. In other words, at the heart of all the utterances of the prophets was the testimony to the Man who was coming, even Jesus. And Peter tells us that the Spirit of Christ moved them to prophesy, 1 Peter 1:11.
The Jews believed that the Messiah would have eight names or titles, and one of the foremost was “The Branch”. There were two main words used in this connection, one being “tsemach”. This word is used in Isaiah 4:2, “In that day shall the Branch of the Lord be beautiful and glorious”; Jeremiah 23:5, “Behold, the days come, that I will raise up unto David a righteous Branch, and a king shall reign and prosper, and He shall execute justice and judgement in the earth”; Jeremiah 33:15, “In those days, and at that time, will I cause the Branch of righteousness to grow up unto David, and He shall execute judgement and righteousness in the land”; Zechariah 3:8, “For, behold, I will bring forth My servant the Branch”, and Zechariah 6:12, “Behold the man whose name is the Branch: and He shall grow up out of His place…and He shall bear the glory, and shall sit and rule upon His throne”. All these scriptures have the idea of the future reign of Christ in them.
The other word used is “netser”, and is found in Isaiah 11:1, “And there shall come forth a rod out of the stem of Jesse, and a Branch shall grow out of his roots…and with righteousness shall He judge the poor, and reprove with equity for the meek of the earth.” The rabbis taught that this verse referred to the Messiah. So in one case the branch grows up unto David, the head of the House of David, from which the King shall come. In the second case, He is a rod out of the stem of Jesse, David’s father, and He will be a branch out of his roots, suggesting humble beginnings. The word “stem” is connected for the verb “to cut”, and suggests a tree cut down. This is how the word is used in Job 14:8, “For there is hope of a tree, if it be cut down, that it will sprout again, and that the tender branch will not cease”. When Christ was born the House of David had long since sunk into obscurity, as is demonstrated by the fact that Joseph, a son of David, was a carpenter. But out of the obscurity of Nazareth a branch comes out of roots of Jesse, David’s father.
And this fits in with situation in Matthew 2, where Christ is taken to live in an obscure village in Galilee, not to Jerusalem, “the city of the great King”, Matthew 5:34, or even Bethlehem, “the city of David”, Luke 2:11.
So there is a play on words here, (some of the prophets used this literary device), with the “Netser” living in Nazereth. Nazareth had a reputation, expressed by Nathaniel when he was told about “Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph”. He replied, “Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?” John 1:46. So even the village was despised and rejected of men. Nathaniel was encouraged to “Come and see”. When he did so he became convinced that Jesus of Nazareth was the Son of God and the King of Israel, verse 49. When the nation of Israel saw Christ at His first coming, they saw in Him no beauty that they should desire Him, Isaiah 53:2, but one day they will see His moral beauty and desire Him. “It shall be said in that day, ‘Lo, this is our God; we have waited for Him, we will be glad and rejoice in His salvation”, Isaiah 25:9. Nathaniel’s experience will be theirs, as the Despised One becomes the Desired One. The carpenter will be recognised as the Creator.